Chinese Corner

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Chinese Corner exam results are in

Editor’s note: Welcome back, Sinophone enthusiasts! Good work to all of the readers who took the final exam in December. This was not an easy test – and it had a few trick questions. But the median and average scores were both 6 out of 10. Well done, everyone!

We have not one but two students who scored 100%. They will each receive a free book of Chinese short stories in the original and English translation: both will receive copies of Short Stories in Chinese, a bilingual text edited by John Balcom (Penguin 2013). Check out the results for each question below and read the Chinese Corner posts that inspired each question. We’ll have more linguistic adventures in the new year, on a roughly monthly basis.

Chinese Corner

Chinese Corner Final Exam

Take the test, win a prize

Editor’s note: When we made the incision point into linguistics exploration back in October 2017, we promised you no tests. What we really should have promised you are no grades. Take this “final exam” at your leisure – this is untimed, “open-site,” and really just for fun. That said, answers are due by December 31. In the new year we’ll check the submissions and award a free book of bilingual Chinese stories to the reader with the highest score. Best of luck, language nerds!

Staff Picks

Christmas Staff Picks

Editor’s note: Dragging your feet on Christmas shopping? You still have two weeks to stuff those stockings with some of our eclectic, China-themed recommendations – food for thought to match any turkey feast.

Paul French: Coffee-table China photography books

Christmas – guests are coming, and it’s time to refresh that tired looking pile on the coffee table. What a vintage year for coffee table books with a Chinese angle. Top of the pile should be Paul Fonoff’s beautiful Chinese Movie Magazines: From Charlie Chaplin to Chairman Mao 1921-1951 (Thames & Hudson). A gargantuan Technicolor feast of Shanghai starlets and stylish movie posters. Then, like the thick slice of juicy turkey in a Boxing Day sandwich, Sunset Survivors (Blacksmith Books) by Lindsay Varty and Gary Jones, documenting Hong Kong’s last traditional tradesmen and women.

Letters to the Editor

Letter to the Editor: Reciprocity

A response to our review of The Reciprocal Translation Project

To the Editors:

Eleanor Goodman’s review of The Reciprocal Translation Project, edited by Sun Dong and myself, attempts to critique non-standard translation in terms of conventional translation ideals. As such, the review misses the point of concepts derived from new poetry that change how we look at ourselves, each other and our world, including translations between languages.

General

Support new Chinese translations on Patreon

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A quick note from us at the China Channel, about a new translation project we're looking to start. Right now, China is going through a nonfiction golden age. Every day, essays, articles, narrative nonfiction and personal memoir is published that puts the world's fastest rising country in a new perspective – told by the voices that are creating China's story, not by foreign observers or anyone else writing in English. Right now, those valuable voices are only read by Chinese speakers but are lost to readers abroad, who are only getting a partial view of one of the most important nations in the world.

We want to change that. If you support our new Patreon drive, from as little as $1 a month, we will be able to start commissioning new translations from Chinese, to widen your horizon. That means everything from migrant memoir to Chinese #metoo reflections, from literary criticism to political screed, selected in partnership with Tabitha Speelman's Changpian newsletter. Good translation takes time, effort and money, but we aim to publish a new translation every month if we hit just $300 in monthly funding. However little you give, from $1 to $10 or more, will help bring material that would otherwise remain inaccessible onto your reading list.